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One of my favourite Where is the evolution  posts:

One of my favourite "Where is the evolution" posts:*Inbox Question:*
“An evolutionist friend of mine shared this article [Shorter-winged swallows evolve around highways], and I had a hard time refuting it.”

*Answer:*
The swallows aren't evolving a new feature. We're observing a culling, with swallows with longer wings being more likely to be killed by cars and less likely to reproduce, and the already existing shorter winged swallows surviving and being able to reproduce. This is only a change in frequency of already-existing genes in the swallow population.
Reference: www.sciencenews.org/article/shorter-winged-swallows-evolve-around-highways
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Every example of a fossilized wing is FULLY developed and functional. Fossil record doesnt provide critical evidence for the theory of evolution.   ...Some critical evidence is missing in the fossil record:
- Evidence for evolving insect wings
- Evidence for evolving butterflies or metamorphosis
- Evidence for evolving bird wings
- Evidence for evolving bacteria
- Evidence for evolving bat wings
- Evidence for evolving wings of flying fish
- Evidence for evolving flowers 
The fossil record doesnt show any evidence for assumed evolution. Instead, EVERY EXAMPLE OF A FOSSILIZED WING IS FULLY DEVELOPED AND FUNCTIONAL. A lack of transitional fossils was a big problem for Charles Darwin:
Why, if species have descended from other species by fine gradations, do we not everywhere see innumerable transitional forms?
Reference: 
https://sciencerefutesevolution.blogspot.com/2020/04/every-example-of-fossilized-wing-is.html?m=1&fbclid=IwAR3QK27_X018p9BYhCVm7HwjFGBU6A9xVB1I4BMHGPWVXwAnjE1MBqLBVOk

"Every example of a fossilized wing is FULLY developed and functional. Fossil record doesn't provide critical evidence for the theory of evolution. ...Some critical evidence is missing in the fossil record:
- Evidence for evolving insect wings
- Evidence for evolving butterflies or metamorphosis
- Evidence for evolving bird wings
- Evidence for evolving bacteria
- Evidence for evolving bat wings
- Evidence for evolving wings of flying fish
- Evidence for evolving flowers
The fossil record doesn't show any evidence for assumed evolution. Instead, EVERY EXAMPLE OF A FOSSILIZED WING IS FULLY DEVELOPED AND FUNCTIONAL. A lack of transitional fossils was a big problem for Charles Darwin:
"Why, if species have descended from other species by fine gradations, do we not everywhere see innumerable transitional forms?"
Reference:
sciencerefutesevolution.blogspot.com/2020/04/every-example-of-fossilized-wing-is.html?m=1&fbclid=...
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Where is the evolution?
Bats pop up in the fossil record [supposedly] around 50 million years ago during a time known as the Eocene. ... The 50-million-year-old bat specimens are already recognizable as bats, so where did they come from? When, where, why and how the first bats become airborne is another mystery buried by Deep Time. ...What came before is only speculative.
Reference:
https://www.smithsonianmag.com/science-nature/bats-evolution-history-180974610/?fbclid=IwAR0V_THEhxrnKLlr71cx6YZvbx-NW-YqctWQymQFFW9UjifdF8Hk6JSugIY

Where is the evolution?
"Bats pop up in the fossil record [supposedly] around 50 million years ago during a time known as the Eocene. ... The 50-million-year-old bat specimens are already recognizable as bats, so where did they come from? When, where, why and how the first bats become airborne is another mystery buried by Deep Time. ...What came before is only speculative."
Reference:
www.smithsonianmag.com/science-nature/bats-evolution-history-180974610/?fbclid=IwAR0V_THEhxrnKLlr...
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Urgent Prophecy Update ... See MoreSee Less

Name: Monito del Monte
Status: Thought to be extinct until its rediscovery.
Information: A remarkable, diminutive marsupial thought to have been extinct until one was discovered in a thicket of Chilean bamboo in the southern Andes.
Thought to exist: 55 million years ago.
Reference: http://historysevidenceofdinosaursandmen.weebly.com/living-fossils.html
The fossilised ankle and ear bones are those of Australias earliest known marsupial, Djarthia, a primitive mouse-like creature that lived 55 million years ago. ..a new study in the journal PLoS ONE [http://www.plosone.org/] has confirmed that Djarthia is also a primitive relative of the small marsupial known as the Monito del Monte - or little mountain monkey - from the dense humid forests of Chile and Argentina.
Reference: http://www.create.unsw.edu.au/news/2008-03-25_monito.html
The monito del monte, Spanish for ‘little bush monkey’, named after its monkey-like partially prehensile tail, is a diminutive marsupial native to South America in the Valdivian temperate rain forests of the southern Andes (Chile and Argentina). It is the only extant species in the ancient order of Microbiotheria. ...Genetic studies show that this species retains the most primitive characteristics of its group, and thus is regarded as a “living fossil.”
reference: http://www.eartharchives.org/articles/scientists-uncover-two-new-species-of-elusive-south-american-marsupial/

Name: Monito del Monte
Status: Thought to be extinct until it's rediscovery.
Information: A remarkable, diminutive marsupial thought to have been extinct until one was discovered in a thicket of Chilean bamboo in the southern Andes.
Thought to exist: 55 million years ago.
Reference: historysevidenceofdinosaursandmen.weebly.com/living-fossils.html
"The fossilised ankle and ear bones are those of Australia's earliest known marsupial, Djarthia, a primitive mouse-like creature that lived 55 million years ago. ..a new study in the journal PLoS ONE [www.plosone.org/] has confirmed that Djarthia is also a primitive relative of the small marsupial known as the Monito del Monte - or "little mountain monkey" - from the dense humid forests of Chile and Argentina."
Reference: www.create.unsw.edu.au/news/2008-03-25_monito.html
"The monito del monte, Spanish for ‘little bush monkey’, named after its monkey-like partially prehensile tail, is a diminutive marsupial native to South America in the Valdivian temperate rain forests of the southern Andes (Chile and Argentina). It is the only extant species in the ancient order of Microbiotheria. ...Genetic studies show that this species retains the most primitive characteristics of its group, and thus is regarded as a “living fossil.”"
reference: www.eartharchives.org/articles/scientists-uncover-two-new-species-of-elusive-south-american-marsu...
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Elephantids were once among the most widespread megafaunal families. However, only three species of this family exist today. To reconstruct their evolutionary history, we generated 14 genomes from living and extinct elephantids and from the American mastodon. While previous studies examined only simple bifurcating relationships, we found that gene flow between elephantid species was common in the past. Straight-tusked elephants descend from a mixture of three ancestral populations related to the ancestor of African elephants, woolly mammoths, and present-day forest elephants. ..interspecies hybridization has been a recurrent feature ....Members of the family Elephantidae, known as elephantids, first appeared in Africa 5 to 10 Mya and are the only surviving family of the order Proboscidea (1, 2). Although many fossil species have been identified, high levels of within-taxon variation have complicated the delineation of species boundaries (1⇓–3). Living elephantids include two species of the genus Loxodonta, the forest elephant (Loxodonta cyclotis) and the savanna elephant (Loxodonta africana), which are restricted to Africa, and one of the genus Elephas, which is endemic to Asia (Elephas maximus). Extinct mammoths (genus Mammuthus) comprise several species, of which the once circumpolar woolly mammoth (Mammuthus primigenius) survived in small isolated island populations well into the Holocene until ∼4,000 y ago (4, 5) while the more temperate North American Columbian mammoth (Mammuthus columbi) disappeared by the end of the last ice age ∼11,000 y ago (6, 7). Straight-tusked elephants (genus Palaeoloxodon) potentially survived as late as ∼50,000 to 35,000 y ago (8) and have been conventionally grouped within Elephas (3, 9), but recent genomic evidence from European straight-tusked elephants (Palaeoloxodon antiquus) over 100,000 y old showed that they were on average more closely related to forest elephants than to any other extant species and led to the suggestion that they were an ancient sister group of modern African forest elephants (10). ... Our results in elephantids thus add to the growing weight of evidence in favor of the view that capacity for hybridization is the norm rather than the exception in many mammalian species
Reference: https://www.pnas.org/content/115/11/E2566
It was previously thought there were two living species of elephants: the African, and the Asian. However, this research suggests that there are actually three: the Asian elephant, the forest-inhabiting African elephant, and the savanna-roaming African elephant.1 ...The two lineages are known to hybridize and produce fertile offspring in local populations today! The paper even gave hybridization as the reason for not previously recognizing the forest and savanna types as distinct.
Reference: https://creation.com/elephant-genome
Stegodontidae is an extinct family of proboscideans that was endemic to Africa and Asia from the Miocene (15.97 mya)[1] to the Late Pleistocene, with some studies suggesting that they survived into the Holocene in China (until as recently as 4.1 thousand years ago),[2] although this is disputed
Reference: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mammoth

"Elephantids were once among the most widespread megafaunal families. However, only three species of this family exist today. To reconstruct their evolutionary history, we generated 14 genomes from living and extinct elephantids and from the American mastodon. While previous studies examined only simple bifurcating relationships, we found that gene flow between elephantid species was common in the past. Straight-tusked elephants descend from a mixture of three ancestral populations related to the ancestor of African elephants, woolly mammoths, and present-day forest elephants. ..interspecies hybridization has been a recurrent feature ....Members of the family Elephantidae, known as elephantids, first appeared in Africa 5 to 10 Mya and are the only surviving family of the order Proboscidea (1, 2). Although many fossil species have been identified, high levels of within-taxon variation have complicated the delineation of species boundaries (1⇓–3). Living elephantids include two species of the genus Loxodonta, the forest elephant (Loxodonta cyclotis) and the savanna elephant (Loxodonta africana), which are restricted to Africa, and one of the genus Elephas, which is endemic to Asia (Elephas maximus). Extinct mammoths (genus Mammuthus) comprise several species, of which the once circumpolar woolly mammoth (Mammuthus primigenius) survived in small isolated island populations well into the Holocene until ∼4,000 y ago (4, 5) while the more temperate North American Columbian mammoth (Mammuthus columbi) disappeared by the end of the last ice age ∼11,000 y ago (6, 7). Straight-tusked elephants (genus Palaeoloxodon) potentially survived as late as ∼50,000 to 35,000 y ago (8) and have been conventionally grouped within Elephas (3, 9), but recent genomic evidence from European straight-tusked elephants (Palaeoloxodon antiquus) over 100,000 y old showed that they were on average more closely related to forest elephants than to any other extant species and led to the suggestion that they were an ancient sister group of modern African forest elephants (10). ... Our results in elephantids thus add to the growing weight of evidence in favor of the view that capacity for hybridization is the norm rather than the exception in many mammalian species"
Reference: www.pnas.org/content/115/11/E2566
"It was previously thought there were two living species of elephants: the African, and the Asian. However, this research suggests that there are actually three: the Asian elephant, the forest-inhabiting African elephant, and the savanna-roaming African elephant.1 ...The two lineages are known to hybridize and produce fertile offspring in local populations today! The paper even gave hybridization as the reason for not previously recognizing the forest and savanna types as distinct."
Reference: creation.com/elephant-genome
"Stegodontidae is an extinct family of proboscideans that was endemic to Africa and Asia from the Miocene (15.97 mya)[1] to the Late Pleistocene, with some studies suggesting that they survived into the Holocene in China (until as recently as 4.1 thousand years ago),[2] although this is disputed"
Reference: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mammoth
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Kangaroos belong to the superfamily Macropodoidea, which also includes wallabies. This superfamily has 62 members native to Australia and Papua New Guinea, ranging in size from those who weigh as little as 2 pounds to about 200 pounds. Six kangaroo species are the big boys of this family, although a new, and slightly smaller, kangaroo family member was discovered in Papua New Guinea in 1990. The wallaroo, a crossbreed of wallaby and kangaroo, is another relative.
Reference: https://animals.mom.me/different-kinds-kangaroos-3196.html
Macropodidae (Kangaroo kind)
Size: head and body 100 cm; tail varies, but shorter than head and body; females slightly smaller
This family includes 65 species placed in 11 genera (Wilson and Reeder 2005). This family is also characterized by a complex stomach. Hybrid data clearly connect three genera (Macropus, Thylogale, Wallabia; Gray 1972; VanGelder 1977).
Reference: https://answersingenesis.org/creation-science/baraminology/mammalian-ark-kinds/?fbclid=IwAR0-bZDlh2ekrbCQtRBrO80yY7kScqplXEceTbVJlggX-0HN3A8PivhxEAw

'Kangaroos belong to the superfamily Macropodoidea, which also includes wallabies. This superfamily has 62 members native to Australia and Papua New Guinea, ranging in size from those who weigh as little as 2 pounds to about 200 pounds. Six kangaroo species are the big boys of this family, although a new, and slightly smaller, kangaroo family member was discovered in Papua New Guinea in 1990. The wallaroo, a crossbreed of wallaby and kangaroo, is another relative.'
Reference: animals.mom.me/different-kinds-kangaroos-3196.html
"Macropodidae (Kangaroo kind)
Size: head and body 100 cm; tail varies, but shorter than head and body; females slightly smaller
This family includes 65 species placed in 11 genera (Wilson and Reeder 2005). This family is also characterized by a complex stomach. Hybrid data clearly connect three genera (Macropus, Thylogale, Wallabia; Gray 1972; VanGelder 1977)."
Reference: answersingenesis.org/creation-science/baraminology/mammalian-ark-kinds/?fbclid=IwAR0-bZDlh2ekrbCQ...
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Natural bear hybrids and studies of few nuclear genes indicate that gene flow among bears may be more common than expected and not limited to polar and brown bears.
Reference: https://www.nature.com/articles/srep46487
Biologists agree that polar bears, brown bears, and black bears all descended from a prototype of the bear kind.
Reference: https://www.icr.org/article/circular-reasoning-polar-bear-origins/

"Natural bear hybrids and studies of few nuclear genes indicate that gene flow among bears may be more common than expected and not limited to polar and brown bears."
Reference: www.nature.com/articles/srep46487
"Biologists agree that polar bears, brown bears, and black bears all descended from a prototype of the bear kind."
Reference: www.icr.org/article/circular-reasoning-polar-bear-origins/
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