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Human living fossils

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FRIDAY at 8:00pm eastern on Shabbat Night Live, Michael Rood continues his interview of filmmaker Tim Mahoney who explains why it's so important that you go see The Red Sea Miracle in theaters on Tuesday, February 18! ... See MoreSee Less

FRIDAY at 8:00pm eastern on Shabbat Night Live: The Red Sea Miracle upcoming two-part documentary is filmmaker Tim Mahoney’s lifework! Michael Rood sits down with the filmmaker for the director’s view of a moviemaking journey that became a miracle in its own right. ... See MoreSee Less

The Red Sea Crossing updated their cover photo.
The Red Sea Crossing

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Frozen in time amber memes

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One of my favourite Where is the evolution  posts:

One of my favourite "Where is the evolution" posts:*Inbox Question:*
“An evolutionist friend of mine shared this article [Shorter-winged swallows evolve around highways], and I had a hard time refuting it.”

*Answer:*
The swallows aren't evolving a new feature. We're observing a culling, with swallows with longer wings being more likely to be killed by cars and less likely to reproduce, and the already existing shorter winged swallows surviving and being able to reproduce. This is only a change in frequency of already-existing genes in the swallow population.
Reference: www.sciencenews.org/article/shorter-winged-swallows-evolve-around-highways
... See MoreSee Less

Every example of a fossilized wing is FULLY developed and functional. Fossil record doesnt provide critical evidence for the theory of evolution.   ...Some critical evidence is missing in the fossil record:
- Evidence for evolving insect wings
- Evidence for evolving butterflies or metamorphosis
- Evidence for evolving bird wings
- Evidence for evolving bacteria
- Evidence for evolving bat wings
- Evidence for evolving wings of flying fish
- Evidence for evolving flowers 
The fossil record doesnt show any evidence for assumed evolution. Instead, EVERY EXAMPLE OF A FOSSILIZED WING IS FULLY DEVELOPED AND FUNCTIONAL. A lack of transitional fossils was a big problem for Charles Darwin:
Why, if species have descended from other species by fine gradations, do we not everywhere see innumerable transitional forms?
Reference: 
https://sciencerefutesevolution.blogspot.com/2020/04/every-example-of-fossilized-wing-is.html?m=1&fbclid=IwAR3QK27_X018p9BYhCVm7HwjFGBU6A9xVB1I4BMHGPWVXwAnjE1MBqLBVOk

"Every example of a fossilized wing is FULLY developed and functional. Fossil record doesn't provide critical evidence for the theory of evolution. ...Some critical evidence is missing in the fossil record:
- Evidence for evolving insect wings
- Evidence for evolving butterflies or metamorphosis
- Evidence for evolving bird wings
- Evidence for evolving bacteria
- Evidence for evolving bat wings
- Evidence for evolving wings of flying fish
- Evidence for evolving flowers
The fossil record doesn't show any evidence for assumed evolution. Instead, EVERY EXAMPLE OF A FOSSILIZED WING IS FULLY DEVELOPED AND FUNCTIONAL. A lack of transitional fossils was a big problem for Charles Darwin:
"Why, if species have descended from other species by fine gradations, do we not everywhere see innumerable transitional forms?"
Reference:
sciencerefutesevolution.blogspot.com/2020/04/every-example-of-fossilized-wing-is.html?m=1&fbclid=...
... See MoreSee Less

Where is the evolution?
Bats pop up in the fossil record [supposedly] around 50 million years ago during a time known as the Eocene. ... The 50-million-year-old bat specimens are already recognizable as bats, so where did they come from? When, where, why and how the first bats become airborne is another mystery buried by Deep Time. ...What came before is only speculative.
Reference:
https://www.smithsonianmag.com/science-nature/bats-evolution-history-180974610/?fbclid=IwAR0V_THEhxrnKLlr71cx6YZvbx-NW-YqctWQymQFFW9UjifdF8Hk6JSugIY

Where is the evolution?
"Bats pop up in the fossil record [supposedly] around 50 million years ago during a time known as the Eocene. ... The 50-million-year-old bat specimens are already recognizable as bats, so where did they come from? When, where, why and how the first bats become airborne is another mystery buried by Deep Time. ...What came before is only speculative."
Reference:
www.smithsonianmag.com/science-nature/bats-evolution-history-180974610/?fbclid=IwAR0V_THEhxrnKLlr...
... See MoreSee Less

Video image

Urgent Prophecy Update ... See MoreSee Less

Name: Monito del Monte
Status: Thought to be extinct until its rediscovery.
Information: A remarkable, diminutive marsupial thought to have been extinct until one was discovered in a thicket of Chilean bamboo in the southern Andes.
Thought to exist: 55 million years ago.
Reference: http://historysevidenceofdinosaursandmen.weebly.com/living-fossils.html
The fossilised ankle and ear bones are those of Australias earliest known marsupial, Djarthia, a primitive mouse-like creature that lived 55 million years ago. ..a new study in the journal PLoS ONE [http://www.plosone.org/] has confirmed that Djarthia is also a primitive relative of the small marsupial known as the Monito del Monte - or little mountain monkey - from the dense humid forests of Chile and Argentina.
Reference: http://www.create.unsw.edu.au/news/2008-03-25_monito.html
The monito del monte, Spanish for ‘little bush monkey’, named after its monkey-like partially prehensile tail, is a diminutive marsupial native to South America in the Valdivian temperate rain forests of the southern Andes (Chile and Argentina). It is the only extant species in the ancient order of Microbiotheria. ...Genetic studies show that this species retains the most primitive characteristics of its group, and thus is regarded as a “living fossil.”
reference: http://www.eartharchives.org/articles/scientists-uncover-two-new-species-of-elusive-south-american-marsupial/

Name: Monito del Monte
Status: Thought to be extinct until it's rediscovery.
Information: A remarkable, diminutive marsupial thought to have been extinct until one was discovered in a thicket of Chilean bamboo in the southern Andes.
Thought to exist: 55 million years ago.
Reference: historysevidenceofdinosaursandmen.weebly.com/living-fossils.html
"The fossilised ankle and ear bones are those of Australia's earliest known marsupial, Djarthia, a primitive mouse-like creature that lived 55 million years ago. ..a new study in the journal PLoS ONE [www.plosone.org/] has confirmed that Djarthia is also a primitive relative of the small marsupial known as the Monito del Monte - or "little mountain monkey" - from the dense humid forests of Chile and Argentina."
Reference: www.create.unsw.edu.au/news/2008-03-25_monito.html
"The monito del monte, Spanish for ‘little bush monkey’, named after its monkey-like partially prehensile tail, is a diminutive marsupial native to South America in the Valdivian temperate rain forests of the southern Andes (Chile and Argentina). It is the only extant species in the ancient order of Microbiotheria. ...Genetic studies show that this species retains the most primitive characteristics of its group, and thus is regarded as a “living fossil.”"
reference: www.eartharchives.org/articles/scientists-uncover-two-new-species-of-elusive-south-american-marsu...
... See MoreSee Less

Elephantids were once among the most widespread megafaunal families. However, only three species of this family exist today. To reconstruct their evolutionary history, we generated 14 genomes from living and extinct elephantids and from the American mastodon. While previous studies examined only simple bifurcating relationships, we found that gene flow between elephantid species was common in the past. Straight-tusked elephants descend from a mixture of three ancestral populations related to the ancestor of African elephants, woolly mammoths, and present-day forest elephants. ..interspecies hybridization has been a recurrent feature ....Members of the family Elephantidae, known as elephantids, first appeared in Africa 5 to 10 Mya and are the only surviving family of the order Proboscidea (1, 2). Although many fossil species have been identified, high levels of within-taxon variation have complicated the delineation of species boundaries (1⇓–3). Living elephantids include two species of the genus Loxodonta, the forest elephant (Loxodonta cyclotis) and the savanna elephant (Loxodonta africana), which are restricted to Africa, and one of the genus Elephas, which is endemic to Asia (Elephas maximus). Extinct mammoths (genus Mammuthus) comprise several species, of which the once circumpolar woolly mammoth (Mammuthus primigenius) survived in small isolated island populations well into the Holocene until ∼4,000 y ago (4, 5) while the more temperate North American Columbian mammoth (Mammuthus columbi) disappeared by the end of the last ice age ∼11,000 y ago (6, 7). Straight-tusked elephants (genus Palaeoloxodon) potentially survived as late as ∼50,000 to 35,000 y ago (8) and have been conventionally grouped within Elephas (3, 9), but recent genomic evidence from European straight-tusked elephants (Palaeoloxodon antiquus) over 100,000 y old showed that they were on average more closely related to forest elephants than to any other extant species and led to the suggestion that they were an ancient sister group of modern African forest elephants (10). ... Our results in elephantids thus add to the growing weight of evidence in favor of the view that capacity for hybridization is the norm rather than the exception in many mammalian species
Reference: https://www.pnas.org/content/115/11/E2566
It was previously thought there were two living species of elephants: the African, and the Asian. However, this research suggests that there are actually three: the Asian elephant, the forest-inhabiting African elephant, and the savanna-roaming African elephant.1 ...The two lineages are known to hybridize and produce fertile offspring in local populations today! The paper even gave hybridization as the reason for not previously recognizing the forest and savanna types as distinct.
Reference: https://creation.com/elephant-genome
Stegodontidae is an extinct family of proboscideans that was endemic to Africa and Asia from the Miocene (15.97 mya)[1] to the Late Pleistocene, with some studies suggesting that they survived into the Holocene in China (until as recently as 4.1 thousand years ago),[2] although this is disputed
Reference: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mammoth

"Elephantids were once among the most widespread megafaunal families. However, only three species of this family exist today. To reconstruct their evolutionary history, we generated 14 genomes from living and extinct elephantids and from the American mastodon. While previous studies examined only simple bifurcating relationships, we found that gene flow between elephantid species was common in the past. Straight-tusked elephants descend from a mixture of three ancestral populations related to the ancestor of African elephants, woolly mammoths, and present-day forest elephants. ..interspecies hybridization has been a recurrent feature ....Members of the family Elephantidae, known as elephantids, first appeared in Africa 5 to 10 Mya and are the only surviving family of the order Proboscidea (1, 2). Although many fossil species have been identified, high levels of within-taxon variation have complicated the delineation of species boundaries (1⇓–3). Living elephantids include two species of the genus Loxodonta, the forest elephant (Loxodonta cyclotis) and the savanna elephant (Loxodonta africana), which are restricted to Africa, and one of the genus Elephas, which is endemic to Asia (Elephas maximus). Extinct mammoths (genus Mammuthus) comprise several species, of which the once circumpolar woolly mammoth (Mammuthus primigenius) survived in small isolated island populations well into the Holocene until ∼4,000 y ago (4, 5) while the more temperate North American Columbian mammoth (Mammuthus columbi) disappeared by the end of the last ice age ∼11,000 y ago (6, 7). Straight-tusked elephants (genus Palaeoloxodon) potentially survived as late as ∼50,000 to 35,000 y ago (8) and have been conventionally grouped within Elephas (3, 9), but recent genomic evidence from European straight-tusked elephants (Palaeoloxodon antiquus) over 100,000 y old showed that they were on average more closely related to forest elephants than to any other extant species and led to the suggestion that they were an ancient sister group of modern African forest elephants (10). ... Our results in elephantids thus add to the growing weight of evidence in favor of the view that capacity for hybridization is the norm rather than the exception in many mammalian species"
Reference: www.pnas.org/content/115/11/E2566
"It was previously thought there were two living species of elephants: the African, and the Asian. However, this research suggests that there are actually three: the Asian elephant, the forest-inhabiting African elephant, and the savanna-roaming African elephant.1 ...The two lineages are known to hybridize and produce fertile offspring in local populations today! The paper even gave hybridization as the reason for not previously recognizing the forest and savanna types as distinct."
Reference: creation.com/elephant-genome
"Stegodontidae is an extinct family of proboscideans that was endemic to Africa and Asia from the Miocene (15.97 mya)[1] to the Late Pleistocene, with some studies suggesting that they survived into the Holocene in China (until as recently as 4.1 thousand years ago),[2] although this is disputed"
Reference: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mammoth
... See MoreSee Less

Kangaroos belong to the superfamily Macropodoidea, which also includes wallabies. This superfamily has 62 members native to Australia and Papua New Guinea, ranging in size from those who weigh as little as 2 pounds to about 200 pounds. Six kangaroo species are the big boys of this family, although a new, and slightly smaller, kangaroo family member was discovered in Papua New Guinea in 1990. The wallaroo, a crossbreed of wallaby and kangaroo, is another relative.
Reference: https://animals.mom.me/different-kinds-kangaroos-3196.html
Macropodidae (Kangaroo kind)
Size: head and body 100 cm; tail varies, but shorter than head and body; females slightly smaller
This family includes 65 species placed in 11 genera (Wilson and Reeder 2005). This family is also characterized by a complex stomach. Hybrid data clearly connect three genera (Macropus, Thylogale, Wallabia; Gray 1972; VanGelder 1977).
Reference: https://answersingenesis.org/creation-science/baraminology/mammalian-ark-kinds/?fbclid=IwAR0-bZDlh2ekrbCQtRBrO80yY7kScqplXEceTbVJlggX-0HN3A8PivhxEAw

'Kangaroos belong to the superfamily Macropodoidea, which also includes wallabies. This superfamily has 62 members native to Australia and Papua New Guinea, ranging in size from those who weigh as little as 2 pounds to about 200 pounds. Six kangaroo species are the big boys of this family, although a new, and slightly smaller, kangaroo family member was discovered in Papua New Guinea in 1990. The wallaroo, a crossbreed of wallaby and kangaroo, is another relative.'
Reference: animals.mom.me/different-kinds-kangaroos-3196.html
"Macropodidae (Kangaroo kind)
Size: head and body 100 cm; tail varies, but shorter than head and body; females slightly smaller
This family includes 65 species placed in 11 genera (Wilson and Reeder 2005). This family is also characterized by a complex stomach. Hybrid data clearly connect three genera (Macropus, Thylogale, Wallabia; Gray 1972; VanGelder 1977)."
Reference: answersingenesis.org/creation-science/baraminology/mammalian-ark-kinds/?fbclid=IwAR0-bZDlh2ekrbCQ...
... See MoreSee Less

Natural bear hybrids and studies of few nuclear genes indicate that gene flow among bears may be more common than expected and not limited to polar and brown bears.
Reference: https://www.nature.com/articles/srep46487
Biologists agree that polar bears, brown bears, and black bears all descended from a prototype of the bear kind.
Reference: https://www.icr.org/article/circular-reasoning-polar-bear-origins/

"Natural bear hybrids and studies of few nuclear genes indicate that gene flow among bears may be more common than expected and not limited to polar and brown bears."
Reference: www.nature.com/articles/srep46487
"Biologists agree that polar bears, brown bears, and black bears all descended from a prototype of the bear kind."
Reference: www.icr.org/article/circular-reasoning-polar-bear-origins/
... See MoreSee Less

Living fossils memes

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Comments Box SVG iconsUsed for the like, share, comment, and reaction icons
One of my favourite Where is the evolution  posts:

One of my favourite "Where is the evolution" posts:*Inbox Question:*
“An evolutionist friend of mine shared this article [Shorter-winged swallows evolve around highways], and I had a hard time refuting it.”

*Answer:*
The swallows aren't evolving a new feature. We're observing a culling, with swallows with longer wings being more likely to be killed by cars and less likely to reproduce, and the already existing shorter winged swallows surviving and being able to reproduce. This is only a change in frequency of already-existing genes in the swallow population.
Reference: www.sciencenews.org/article/shorter-winged-swallows-evolve-around-highways
... See MoreSee Less

Every example of a fossilized wing is FULLY developed and functional. Fossil record doesnt provide critical evidence for the theory of evolution.   ...Some critical evidence is missing in the fossil record:
- Evidence for evolving insect wings
- Evidence for evolving butterflies or metamorphosis
- Evidence for evolving bird wings
- Evidence for evolving bacteria
- Evidence for evolving bat wings
- Evidence for evolving wings of flying fish
- Evidence for evolving flowers 
The fossil record doesnt show any evidence for assumed evolution. Instead, EVERY EXAMPLE OF A FOSSILIZED WING IS FULLY DEVELOPED AND FUNCTIONAL. A lack of transitional fossils was a big problem for Charles Darwin:
Why, if species have descended from other species by fine gradations, do we not everywhere see innumerable transitional forms?
Reference: 
https://sciencerefutesevolution.blogspot.com/2020/04/every-example-of-fossilized-wing-is.html?m=1&fbclid=IwAR3QK27_X018p9BYhCVm7HwjFGBU6A9xVB1I4BMHGPWVXwAnjE1MBqLBVOk

"Every example of a fossilized wing is FULLY developed and functional. Fossil record doesn't provide critical evidence for the theory of evolution. ...Some critical evidence is missing in the fossil record:
- Evidence for evolving insect wings
- Evidence for evolving butterflies or metamorphosis
- Evidence for evolving bird wings
- Evidence for evolving bacteria
- Evidence for evolving bat wings
- Evidence for evolving wings of flying fish
- Evidence for evolving flowers
The fossil record doesn't show any evidence for assumed evolution. Instead, EVERY EXAMPLE OF A FOSSILIZED WING IS FULLY DEVELOPED AND FUNCTIONAL. A lack of transitional fossils was a big problem for Charles Darwin:
"Why, if species have descended from other species by fine gradations, do we not everywhere see innumerable transitional forms?"
Reference:
sciencerefutesevolution.blogspot.com/2020/04/every-example-of-fossilized-wing-is.html?m=1&fbclid=...
... See MoreSee Less

Where is the evolution?
Bats pop up in the fossil record [supposedly] around 50 million years ago during a time known as the Eocene. ... The 50-million-year-old bat specimens are already recognizable as bats, so where did they come from? When, where, why and how the first bats become airborne is another mystery buried by Deep Time. ...What came before is only speculative.
Reference:
https://www.smithsonianmag.com/science-nature/bats-evolution-history-180974610/?fbclid=IwAR0V_THEhxrnKLlr71cx6YZvbx-NW-YqctWQymQFFW9UjifdF8Hk6JSugIY

Where is the evolution?
"Bats pop up in the fossil record [supposedly] around 50 million years ago during a time known as the Eocene. ... The 50-million-year-old bat specimens are already recognizable as bats, so where did they come from? When, where, why and how the first bats become airborne is another mystery buried by Deep Time. ...What came before is only speculative."
Reference:
www.smithsonianmag.com/science-nature/bats-evolution-history-180974610/?fbclid=IwAR0V_THEhxrnKLlr...
... See MoreSee Less

Video image

Urgent Prophecy Update ... See MoreSee Less

Name: Monito del Monte
Status: Thought to be extinct until its rediscovery.
Information: A remarkable, diminutive marsupial thought to have been extinct until one was discovered in a thicket of Chilean bamboo in the southern Andes.
Thought to exist: 55 million years ago.
Reference: http://historysevidenceofdinosaursandmen.weebly.com/living-fossils.html
The fossilised ankle and ear bones are those of Australias earliest known marsupial, Djarthia, a primitive mouse-like creature that lived 55 million years ago. ..a new study in the journal PLoS ONE [http://www.plosone.org/] has confirmed that Djarthia is also a primitive relative of the small marsupial known as the Monito del Monte - or little mountain monkey - from the dense humid forests of Chile and Argentina.
Reference: http://www.create.unsw.edu.au/news/2008-03-25_monito.html
The monito del monte, Spanish for ‘little bush monkey’, named after its monkey-like partially prehensile tail, is a diminutive marsupial native to South America in the Valdivian temperate rain forests of the southern Andes (Chile and Argentina). It is the only extant species in the ancient order of Microbiotheria. ...Genetic studies show that this species retains the most primitive characteristics of its group, and thus is regarded as a “living fossil.”
reference: http://www.eartharchives.org/articles/scientists-uncover-two-new-species-of-elusive-south-american-marsupial/

Name: Monito del Monte
Status: Thought to be extinct until it's rediscovery.
Information: A remarkable, diminutive marsupial thought to have been extinct until one was discovered in a thicket of Chilean bamboo in the southern Andes.
Thought to exist: 55 million years ago.
Reference: historysevidenceofdinosaursandmen.weebly.com/living-fossils.html
"The fossilised ankle and ear bones are those of Australia's earliest known marsupial, Djarthia, a primitive mouse-like creature that lived 55 million years ago. ..a new study in the journal PLoS ONE [www.plosone.org/] has confirmed that Djarthia is also a primitive relative of the small marsupial known as the Monito del Monte - or "little mountain monkey" - from the dense humid forests of Chile and Argentina."
Reference: www.create.unsw.edu.au/news/2008-03-25_monito.html
"The monito del monte, Spanish for ‘little bush monkey’, named after its monkey-like partially prehensile tail, is a diminutive marsupial native to South America in the Valdivian temperate rain forests of the southern Andes (Chile and Argentina). It is the only extant species in the ancient order of Microbiotheria. ...Genetic studies show that this species retains the most primitive characteristics of its group, and thus is regarded as a “living fossil.”"
reference: www.eartharchives.org/articles/scientists-uncover-two-new-species-of-elusive-south-american-marsu...
... See MoreSee Less

Elephantids were once among the most widespread megafaunal families. However, only three species of this family exist today. To reconstruct their evolutionary history, we generated 14 genomes from living and extinct elephantids and from the American mastodon. While previous studies examined only simple bifurcating relationships, we found that gene flow between elephantid species was common in the past. Straight-tusked elephants descend from a mixture of three ancestral populations related to the ancestor of African elephants, woolly mammoths, and present-day forest elephants. ..interspecies hybridization has been a recurrent feature ....Members of the family Elephantidae, known as elephantids, first appeared in Africa 5 to 10 Mya and are the only surviving family of the order Proboscidea (1, 2). Although many fossil species have been identified, high levels of within-taxon variation have complicated the delineation of species boundaries (1⇓–3). Living elephantids include two species of the genus Loxodonta, the forest elephant (Loxodonta cyclotis) and the savanna elephant (Loxodonta africana), which are restricted to Africa, and one of the genus Elephas, which is endemic to Asia (Elephas maximus). Extinct mammoths (genus Mammuthus) comprise several species, of which the once circumpolar woolly mammoth (Mammuthus primigenius) survived in small isolated island populations well into the Holocene until ∼4,000 y ago (4, 5) while the more temperate North American Columbian mammoth (Mammuthus columbi) disappeared by the end of the last ice age ∼11,000 y ago (6, 7). Straight-tusked elephants (genus Palaeoloxodon) potentially survived as late as ∼50,000 to 35,000 y ago (8) and have been conventionally grouped within Elephas (3, 9), but recent genomic evidence from European straight-tusked elephants (Palaeoloxodon antiquus) over 100,000 y old showed that they were on average more closely related to forest elephants than to any other extant species and led to the suggestion that they were an ancient sister group of modern African forest elephants (10). ... Our results in elephantids thus add to the growing weight of evidence in favor of the view that capacity for hybridization is the norm rather than the exception in many mammalian species
Reference: https://www.pnas.org/content/115/11/E2566
It was previously thought there were two living species of elephants: the African, and the Asian. However, this research suggests that there are actually three: the Asian elephant, the forest-inhabiting African elephant, and the savanna-roaming African elephant.1 ...The two lineages are known to hybridize and produce fertile offspring in local populations today! The paper even gave hybridization as the reason for not previously recognizing the forest and savanna types as distinct.
Reference: https://creation.com/elephant-genome
Stegodontidae is an extinct family of proboscideans that was endemic to Africa and Asia from the Miocene (15.97 mya)[1] to the Late Pleistocene, with some studies suggesting that they survived into the Holocene in China (until as recently as 4.1 thousand years ago),[2] although this is disputed
Reference: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mammoth

"Elephantids were once among the most widespread megafaunal families. However, only three species of this family exist today. To reconstruct their evolutionary history, we generated 14 genomes from living and extinct elephantids and from the American mastodon. While previous studies examined only simple bifurcating relationships, we found that gene flow between elephantid species was common in the past. Straight-tusked elephants descend from a mixture of three ancestral populations related to the ancestor of African elephants, woolly mammoths, and present-day forest elephants. ..interspecies hybridization has been a recurrent feature ....Members of the family Elephantidae, known as elephantids, first appeared in Africa 5 to 10 Mya and are the only surviving family of the order Proboscidea (1, 2). Although many fossil species have been identified, high levels of within-taxon variation have complicated the delineation of species boundaries (1⇓–3). Living elephantids include two species of the genus Loxodonta, the forest elephant (Loxodonta cyclotis) and the savanna elephant (Loxodonta africana), which are restricted to Africa, and one of the genus Elephas, which is endemic to Asia (Elephas maximus). Extinct mammoths (genus Mammuthus) comprise several species, of which the once circumpolar woolly mammoth (Mammuthus primigenius) survived in small isolated island populations well into the Holocene until ∼4,000 y ago (4, 5) while the more temperate North American Columbian mammoth (Mammuthus columbi) disappeared by the end of the last ice age ∼11,000 y ago (6, 7). Straight-tusked elephants (genus Palaeoloxodon) potentially survived as late as ∼50,000 to 35,000 y ago (8) and have been conventionally grouped within Elephas (3, 9), but recent genomic evidence from European straight-tusked elephants (Palaeoloxodon antiquus) over 100,000 y old showed that they were on average more closely related to forest elephants than to any other extant species and led to the suggestion that they were an ancient sister group of modern African forest elephants (10). ... Our results in elephantids thus add to the growing weight of evidence in favor of the view that capacity for hybridization is the norm rather than the exception in many mammalian species"
Reference: www.pnas.org/content/115/11/E2566
"It was previously thought there were two living species of elephants: the African, and the Asian. However, this research suggests that there are actually three: the Asian elephant, the forest-inhabiting African elephant, and the savanna-roaming African elephant.1 ...The two lineages are known to hybridize and produce fertile offspring in local populations today! The paper even gave hybridization as the reason for not previously recognizing the forest and savanna types as distinct."
Reference: creation.com/elephant-genome
"Stegodontidae is an extinct family of proboscideans that was endemic to Africa and Asia from the Miocene (15.97 mya)[1] to the Late Pleistocene, with some studies suggesting that they survived into the Holocene in China (until as recently as 4.1 thousand years ago),[2] although this is disputed"
Reference: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mammoth
... See MoreSee Less

Kangaroos belong to the superfamily Macropodoidea, which also includes wallabies. This superfamily has 62 members native to Australia and Papua New Guinea, ranging in size from those who weigh as little as 2 pounds to about 200 pounds. Six kangaroo species are the big boys of this family, although a new, and slightly smaller, kangaroo family member was discovered in Papua New Guinea in 1990. The wallaroo, a crossbreed of wallaby and kangaroo, is another relative.
Reference: https://animals.mom.me/different-kinds-kangaroos-3196.html
Macropodidae (Kangaroo kind)
Size: head and body 100 cm; tail varies, but shorter than head and body; females slightly smaller
This family includes 65 species placed in 11 genera (Wilson and Reeder 2005). This family is also characterized by a complex stomach. Hybrid data clearly connect three genera (Macropus, Thylogale, Wallabia; Gray 1972; VanGelder 1977).
Reference: https://answersingenesis.org/creation-science/baraminology/mammalian-ark-kinds/?fbclid=IwAR0-bZDlh2ekrbCQtRBrO80yY7kScqplXEceTbVJlggX-0HN3A8PivhxEAw

'Kangaroos belong to the superfamily Macropodoidea, which also includes wallabies. This superfamily has 62 members native to Australia and Papua New Guinea, ranging in size from those who weigh as little as 2 pounds to about 200 pounds. Six kangaroo species are the big boys of this family, although a new, and slightly smaller, kangaroo family member was discovered in Papua New Guinea in 1990. The wallaroo, a crossbreed of wallaby and kangaroo, is another relative.'
Reference: animals.mom.me/different-kinds-kangaroos-3196.html
"Macropodidae (Kangaroo kind)
Size: head and body 100 cm; tail varies, but shorter than head and body; females slightly smaller
This family includes 65 species placed in 11 genera (Wilson and Reeder 2005). This family is also characterized by a complex stomach. Hybrid data clearly connect three genera (Macropus, Thylogale, Wallabia; Gray 1972; VanGelder 1977)."
Reference: answersingenesis.org/creation-science/baraminology/mammalian-ark-kinds/?fbclid=IwAR0-bZDlh2ekrbCQ...
... See MoreSee Less

Natural bear hybrids and studies of few nuclear genes indicate that gene flow among bears may be more common than expected and not limited to polar and brown bears.
Reference: https://www.nature.com/articles/srep46487
Biologists agree that polar bears, brown bears, and black bears all descended from a prototype of the bear kind.
Reference: https://www.icr.org/article/circular-reasoning-polar-bear-origins/

"Natural bear hybrids and studies of few nuclear genes indicate that gene flow among bears may be more common than expected and not limited to polar and brown bears."
Reference: www.nature.com/articles/srep46487
"Biologists agree that polar bears, brown bears, and black bears all descended from a prototype of the bear kind."
Reference: www.icr.org/article/circular-reasoning-polar-bear-origins/
... See MoreSee Less

Red sea crossing
Is there evidence of the Red Sea Crossing? Let’s take a look at the video below.

What you'll see in this video above.

The small village given to Joseph by Pharaoh in the land of Goshen.

The computer recreation of what the buildings looked like which matches buildings in Israel.

The bricks made without straw which did not hold up over time.

Wall painting of Moses, after he found out he was a Israelite, getting onto a task master for beating a Israelite.

The alter that was built while Moses was getting the 10 Commandments.

The Egyptian cow carved on the side of alter, proving it's connection to Egypt and the Israelite.

The rock that Moses hit and it split and water ran from it. The rocks beneath are smoothed from the water flow.

Mt. Sinai. The mountain God came down to which burned with fire and Moses got the 10 Commandments. Noticed it's burnt from the top down.

The path the Israelites escaped from Egypt on, and the beach they stood on before they crossed the Red Sea.

The chariot wheel and axle found on the sea floor.

Golden chariot wheel that either belonged to the Pharaoh, or a high ranking military personnel. This cannot be moved for 2 reasons. It's laminated and the wood no longer exists making it very thin. And it's against the arabic law to remove anything from their oceans.

The robot camera used to film the underwater evidence.

Chariot wheel grown over with coral.

4 and 6 spokes chariot wheels found which coincides with the biblical timeline.

The explorers

The professors and associates

Etc... There is much more on the video.

FaceBook

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FRIDAY at 8:00pm eastern on Shabbat Night Live, Michael Rood continues his interview of filmmaker Tim Mahoney who explains why it's so important that you go see The Red Sea Miracle in theaters on Tuesday, February 18! ... See MoreSee Less

FRIDAY at 8:00pm eastern on Shabbat Night Live: The Red Sea Miracle upcoming two-part documentary is filmmaker Tim Mahoney’s lifework! Michael Rood sits down with the filmmaker for the director’s view of a moviemaking journey that became a miracle in its own right. ... See MoreSee Less

The Red Sea Crossing updated their cover photo.
The Red Sea Crossing

... See MoreSee Less

YouTube Videos

Red Sea and Mt. Sinai

Human and Dinosaur evidence found together

Human & Dinosaur prints

Inca burial stone aka Ica stones

Human misc. out of place evidence

Living Fossils, blood and soft tissue disprove evolution

FaceBook Feed

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One of my favourite Where is the evolution  posts:

One of my favourite "Where is the evolution" posts:*Inbox Question:*
“An evolutionist friend of mine shared this article [Shorter-winged swallows evolve around highways], and I had a hard time refuting it.”

*Answer:*
The swallows aren't evolving a new feature. We're observing a culling, with swallows with longer wings being more likely to be killed by cars and less likely to reproduce, and the already existing shorter winged swallows surviving and being able to reproduce. This is only a change in frequency of already-existing genes in the swallow population.
Reference: www.sciencenews.org/article/shorter-winged-swallows-evolve-around-highways
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Every example of a fossilized wing is FULLY developed and functional. Fossil record doesnt provide critical evidence for the theory of evolution.   ...Some critical evidence is missing in the fossil record:
- Evidence for evolving insect wings
- Evidence for evolving butterflies or metamorphosis
- Evidence for evolving bird wings
- Evidence for evolving bacteria
- Evidence for evolving bat wings
- Evidence for evolving wings of flying fish
- Evidence for evolving flowers 
The fossil record doesnt show any evidence for assumed evolution. Instead, EVERY EXAMPLE OF A FOSSILIZED WING IS FULLY DEVELOPED AND FUNCTIONAL. A lack of transitional fossils was a big problem for Charles Darwin:
Why, if species have descended from other species by fine gradations, do we not everywhere see innumerable transitional forms?
Reference: 
https://sciencerefutesevolution.blogspot.com/2020/04/every-example-of-fossilized-wing-is.html?m=1&fbclid=IwAR3QK27_X018p9BYhCVm7HwjFGBU6A9xVB1I4BMHGPWVXwAnjE1MBqLBVOk

"Every example of a fossilized wing is FULLY developed and functional. Fossil record doesn't provide critical evidence for the theory of evolution. ...Some critical evidence is missing in the fossil record:
- Evidence for evolving insect wings
- Evidence for evolving butterflies or metamorphosis
- Evidence for evolving bird wings
- Evidence for evolving bacteria
- Evidence for evolving bat wings
- Evidence for evolving wings of flying fish
- Evidence for evolving flowers
The fossil record doesn't show any evidence for assumed evolution. Instead, EVERY EXAMPLE OF A FOSSILIZED WING IS FULLY DEVELOPED AND FUNCTIONAL. A lack of transitional fossils was a big problem for Charles Darwin:
"Why, if species have descended from other species by fine gradations, do we not everywhere see innumerable transitional forms?"
Reference:
sciencerefutesevolution.blogspot.com/2020/04/every-example-of-fossilized-wing-is.html?m=1&fbclid=...
... See MoreSee Less

Where is the evolution?
Bats pop up in the fossil record [supposedly] around 50 million years ago during a time known as the Eocene. ... The 50-million-year-old bat specimens are already recognizable as bats, so where did they come from? When, where, why and how the first bats become airborne is another mystery buried by Deep Time. ...What came before is only speculative.
Reference:
https://www.smithsonianmag.com/science-nature/bats-evolution-history-180974610/?fbclid=IwAR0V_THEhxrnKLlr71cx6YZvbx-NW-YqctWQymQFFW9UjifdF8Hk6JSugIY

Where is the evolution?
"Bats pop up in the fossil record [supposedly] around 50 million years ago during a time known as the Eocene. ... The 50-million-year-old bat specimens are already recognizable as bats, so where did they come from? When, where, why and how the first bats become airborne is another mystery buried by Deep Time. ...What came before is only speculative."
Reference:
www.smithsonianmag.com/science-nature/bats-evolution-history-180974610/?fbclid=IwAR0V_THEhxrnKLlr...
... See MoreSee Less

Video image

Urgent Prophecy Update ... See MoreSee Less

Name: Monito del Monte
Status: Thought to be extinct until its rediscovery.
Information: A remarkable, diminutive marsupial thought to have been extinct until one was discovered in a thicket of Chilean bamboo in the southern Andes.
Thought to exist: 55 million years ago.
Reference: http://historysevidenceofdinosaursandmen.weebly.com/living-fossils.html
The fossilised ankle and ear bones are those of Australias earliest known marsupial, Djarthia, a primitive mouse-like creature that lived 55 million years ago. ..a new study in the journal PLoS ONE [http://www.plosone.org/] has confirmed that Djarthia is also a primitive relative of the small marsupial known as the Monito del Monte - or little mountain monkey - from the dense humid forests of Chile and Argentina.
Reference: http://www.create.unsw.edu.au/news/2008-03-25_monito.html
The monito del monte, Spanish for ‘little bush monkey’, named after its monkey-like partially prehensile tail, is a diminutive marsupial native to South America in the Valdivian temperate rain forests of the southern Andes (Chile and Argentina). It is the only extant species in the ancient order of Microbiotheria. ...Genetic studies show that this species retains the most primitive characteristics of its group, and thus is regarded as a “living fossil.”
reference: http://www.eartharchives.org/articles/scientists-uncover-two-new-species-of-elusive-south-american-marsupial/

Name: Monito del Monte
Status: Thought to be extinct until it's rediscovery.
Information: A remarkable, diminutive marsupial thought to have been extinct until one was discovered in a thicket of Chilean bamboo in the southern Andes.
Thought to exist: 55 million years ago.
Reference: historysevidenceofdinosaursandmen.weebly.com/living-fossils.html
"The fossilised ankle and ear bones are those of Australia's earliest known marsupial, Djarthia, a primitive mouse-like creature that lived 55 million years ago. ..a new study in the journal PLoS ONE [www.plosone.org/] has confirmed that Djarthia is also a primitive relative of the small marsupial known as the Monito del Monte - or "little mountain monkey" - from the dense humid forests of Chile and Argentina."
Reference: www.create.unsw.edu.au/news/2008-03-25_monito.html
"The monito del monte, Spanish for ‘little bush monkey’, named after its monkey-like partially prehensile tail, is a diminutive marsupial native to South America in the Valdivian temperate rain forests of the southern Andes (Chile and Argentina). It is the only extant species in the ancient order of Microbiotheria. ...Genetic studies show that this species retains the most primitive characteristics of its group, and thus is regarded as a “living fossil.”"
reference: www.eartharchives.org/articles/scientists-uncover-two-new-species-of-elusive-south-american-marsu...
... See MoreSee Less

Elephantids were once among the most widespread megafaunal families. However, only three species of this family exist today. To reconstruct their evolutionary history, we generated 14 genomes from living and extinct elephantids and from the American mastodon. While previous studies examined only simple bifurcating relationships, we found that gene flow between elephantid species was common in the past. Straight-tusked elephants descend from a mixture of three ancestral populations related to the ancestor of African elephants, woolly mammoths, and present-day forest elephants. ..interspecies hybridization has been a recurrent feature ....Members of the family Elephantidae, known as elephantids, first appeared in Africa 5 to 10 Mya and are the only surviving family of the order Proboscidea (1, 2). Although many fossil species have been identified, high levels of within-taxon variation have complicated the delineation of species boundaries (1⇓–3). Living elephantids include two species of the genus Loxodonta, the forest elephant (Loxodonta cyclotis) and the savanna elephant (Loxodonta africana), which are restricted to Africa, and one of the genus Elephas, which is endemic to Asia (Elephas maximus). Extinct mammoths (genus Mammuthus) comprise several species, of which the once circumpolar woolly mammoth (Mammuthus primigenius) survived in small isolated island populations well into the Holocene until ∼4,000 y ago (4, 5) while the more temperate North American Columbian mammoth (Mammuthus columbi) disappeared by the end of the last ice age ∼11,000 y ago (6, 7). Straight-tusked elephants (genus Palaeoloxodon) potentially survived as late as ∼50,000 to 35,000 y ago (8) and have been conventionally grouped within Elephas (3, 9), but recent genomic evidence from European straight-tusked elephants (Palaeoloxodon antiquus) over 100,000 y old showed that they were on average more closely related to forest elephants than to any other extant species and led to the suggestion that they were an ancient sister group of modern African forest elephants (10). ... Our results in elephantids thus add to the growing weight of evidence in favor of the view that capacity for hybridization is the norm rather than the exception in many mammalian species
Reference: https://www.pnas.org/content/115/11/E2566
It was previously thought there were two living species of elephants: the African, and the Asian. However, this research suggests that there are actually three: the Asian elephant, the forest-inhabiting African elephant, and the savanna-roaming African elephant.1 ...The two lineages are known to hybridize and produce fertile offspring in local populations today! The paper even gave hybridization as the reason for not previously recognizing the forest and savanna types as distinct.
Reference: https://creation.com/elephant-genome
Stegodontidae is an extinct family of proboscideans that was endemic to Africa and Asia from the Miocene (15.97 mya)[1] to the Late Pleistocene, with some studies suggesting that they survived into the Holocene in China (until as recently as 4.1 thousand years ago),[2] although this is disputed
Reference: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mammoth

"Elephantids were once among the most widespread megafaunal families. However, only three species of this family exist today. To reconstruct their evolutionary history, we generated 14 genomes from living and extinct elephantids and from the American mastodon. While previous studies examined only simple bifurcating relationships, we found that gene flow between elephantid species was common in the past. Straight-tusked elephants descend from a mixture of three ancestral populations related to the ancestor of African elephants, woolly mammoths, and present-day forest elephants. ..interspecies hybridization has been a recurrent feature ....Members of the family Elephantidae, known as elephantids, first appeared in Africa 5 to 10 Mya and are the only surviving family of the order Proboscidea (1, 2). Although many fossil species have been identified, high levels of within-taxon variation have complicated the delineation of species boundaries (1⇓–3). Living elephantids include two species of the genus Loxodonta, the forest elephant (Loxodonta cyclotis) and the savanna elephant (Loxodonta africana), which are restricted to Africa, and one of the genus Elephas, which is endemic to Asia (Elephas maximus). Extinct mammoths (genus Mammuthus) comprise several species, of which the once circumpolar woolly mammoth (Mammuthus primigenius) survived in small isolated island populations well into the Holocene until ∼4,000 y ago (4, 5) while the more temperate North American Columbian mammoth (Mammuthus columbi) disappeared by the end of the last ice age ∼11,000 y ago (6, 7). Straight-tusked elephants (genus Palaeoloxodon) potentially survived as late as ∼50,000 to 35,000 y ago (8) and have been conventionally grouped within Elephas (3, 9), but recent genomic evidence from European straight-tusked elephants (Palaeoloxodon antiquus) over 100,000 y old showed that they were on average more closely related to forest elephants than to any other extant species and led to the suggestion that they were an ancient sister group of modern African forest elephants (10). ... Our results in elephantids thus add to the growing weight of evidence in favor of the view that capacity for hybridization is the norm rather than the exception in many mammalian species"
Reference: www.pnas.org/content/115/11/E2566
"It was previously thought there were two living species of elephants: the African, and the Asian. However, this research suggests that there are actually three: the Asian elephant, the forest-inhabiting African elephant, and the savanna-roaming African elephant.1 ...The two lineages are known to hybridize and produce fertile offspring in local populations today! The paper even gave hybridization as the reason for not previously recognizing the forest and savanna types as distinct."
Reference: creation.com/elephant-genome
"Stegodontidae is an extinct family of proboscideans that was endemic to Africa and Asia from the Miocene (15.97 mya)[1] to the Late Pleistocene, with some studies suggesting that they survived into the Holocene in China (until as recently as 4.1 thousand years ago),[2] although this is disputed"
Reference: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mammoth
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Kangaroos belong to the superfamily Macropodoidea, which also includes wallabies. This superfamily has 62 members native to Australia and Papua New Guinea, ranging in size from those who weigh as little as 2 pounds to about 200 pounds. Six kangaroo species are the big boys of this family, although a new, and slightly smaller, kangaroo family member was discovered in Papua New Guinea in 1990. The wallaroo, a crossbreed of wallaby and kangaroo, is another relative.
Reference: https://animals.mom.me/different-kinds-kangaroos-3196.html
Macropodidae (Kangaroo kind)
Size: head and body 100 cm; tail varies, but shorter than head and body; females slightly smaller
This family includes 65 species placed in 11 genera (Wilson and Reeder 2005). This family is also characterized by a complex stomach. Hybrid data clearly connect three genera (Macropus, Thylogale, Wallabia; Gray 1972; VanGelder 1977).
Reference: https://answersingenesis.org/creation-science/baraminology/mammalian-ark-kinds/?fbclid=IwAR0-bZDlh2ekrbCQtRBrO80yY7kScqplXEceTbVJlggX-0HN3A8PivhxEAw

'Kangaroos belong to the superfamily Macropodoidea, which also includes wallabies. This superfamily has 62 members native to Australia and Papua New Guinea, ranging in size from those who weigh as little as 2 pounds to about 200 pounds. Six kangaroo species are the big boys of this family, although a new, and slightly smaller, kangaroo family member was discovered in Papua New Guinea in 1990. The wallaroo, a crossbreed of wallaby and kangaroo, is another relative.'
Reference: animals.mom.me/different-kinds-kangaroos-3196.html
"Macropodidae (Kangaroo kind)
Size: head and body 100 cm; tail varies, but shorter than head and body; females slightly smaller
This family includes 65 species placed in 11 genera (Wilson and Reeder 2005). This family is also characterized by a complex stomach. Hybrid data clearly connect three genera (Macropus, Thylogale, Wallabia; Gray 1972; VanGelder 1977)."
Reference: answersingenesis.org/creation-science/baraminology/mammalian-ark-kinds/?fbclid=IwAR0-bZDlh2ekrbCQ...
... See MoreSee Less

Natural bear hybrids and studies of few nuclear genes indicate that gene flow among bears may be more common than expected and not limited to polar and brown bears.
Reference: https://www.nature.com/articles/srep46487
Biologists agree that polar bears, brown bears, and black bears all descended from a prototype of the bear kind.
Reference: https://www.icr.org/article/circular-reasoning-polar-bear-origins/

"Natural bear hybrids and studies of few nuclear genes indicate that gene flow among bears may be more common than expected and not limited to polar and brown bears."
Reference: www.nature.com/articles/srep46487
"Biologists agree that polar bears, brown bears, and black bears all descended from a prototype of the bear kind."
Reference: www.icr.org/article/circular-reasoning-polar-bear-origins/
... See MoreSee Less

10 Million Dollar Challenge Evolution 2.0

Read this FaceBook post first

And the reason I support this challenge is because if this cannot be done. It will be just one more things that can be used against evolution..

You can get the first 3 chapters free, click on image.

Click images to play videos or visit site

The difference between intelligence and programmed response.

Original video with challenge.

Latest video.

You can accept the challenge by clicking on this image to visit website.

This challenge is much like possibility math. An intelligent process has the ability to learn from it’s mistakes. Therefore won’t repeat them.

An unintelligent process has no learning curve. Therefore can repeat the same mistakes an infinite number of times. Therefore, making the absolute of math, in possibility math, impossible to calculate. And it does not matter how much time you give the unintelligent probability math, time will not help.

When there is no answer, and time is given instead of proof. Then time becomes the excuse for not having proof. Time is the atheist God did it excuse without God. ~ Issac

The people behind this challenge

Kevin Ham

Activist Mommy – Elizabeth Johnston

Website feeds:
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FaceBook Page

click here to Visit Activist Mommy main website
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🔥

🔥 ... See MoreSee Less

Mommy and baby matter! ❤️

Mommy and baby matter! ❤️ ... See MoreSee Less

I don't even have anything to add to this. This video speaks for itself. Total communistic control is what the left wants. ... See MoreSee Less

Globalists can not control us when we are unified. In order to conquer us, the enemies of liberty must divide us! Do no fall prey to their devices. We are all members of the same race...the human race. Truly, a relationship with Jesus Christ is the only thing I have seen that breaks down all walls of prejudice. Because I am a Christian, I am colorblind. Now is the time to continue to win souls to Christ, for only when we turn to Him will our nation be healed. My heart is broken today for the families of all who have been killed through recent violence, for all the babies being killed through abortion, and for the liberties we have lost. Our nation is awash with the blood of innocents. Lord, hear our cry and heal our land!

Globalists can not control us when we are unified. In order to conquer us, the enemies of liberty must divide us! Do no fall prey to their devices. We are all members of the same race...the human race. Truly, a relationship with Jesus Christ is the only thing I have seen that breaks down all walls of prejudice. Because I am a Christian, I am colorblind. Now is the time to continue to win souls to Christ, for only when we turn to Him will our nation be healed. My heart is broken today for the families of all who have been killed through recent violence, for all the babies being killed through abortion, and for the liberties we have lost. Our nation is awash with the blood of innocents. Lord, hear our cry and heal our land! ... See MoreSee Less

YouTube Channel, click to visit

Videos, just click to watch

My personal favorite!

Twitter click to visit page

Instagram click image to visit

Quebec to bar public servants from wearing clothing with religious symbols

Click image to read story

Yep, you heard it right. Not only clothing but because jewelry is also considered a part of your attire, that will be banned also. Atheists cannot prove God does not exist, so the next best thing is to silence us. Poor atheists. As to why they censor everyone.

Soft tissue fossils found!

They have been finding soft tissue fossils for a while now. Science, at first called it a fluke to explain away why this exists at all. But because it’s become more commonplace they have accepted the evidence but not what it points to aka the flood and Young Earth Creation (6,000 years).

Below is a image of how many times soft tissue find unfossilized have been published. The find range over 100 and the published articles almost 50.